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European Yearbook on Human Rights 2015

ISBN: 978-3-7083-1040-4
512 p., paperback, June 2015
Editors: Wolfgang Benedek / Florence Benoît-Rohmer / Wolfram Karl / Matthias C. Kettemann / Manfred Nowak
2014 was a year of transition and controversy in Europe: a new Parliament and new Commission were constituted and Opinion 2/13 of the Court of Justice of the European Union on the EU’s accession to the European Convention on Human Rights raised serious questions about the coherence and future character of the human rights protection regimes in Europe.
Across 38 contributions by 61 authors in five sections, the seventh edition of the European Yearbook on Human Rights 2015 explains and contextualizes key developments in human rights.
Edited jointly by representatives of four major European human rights research, teaching and training institutions, the Yearbook 2015 covers political and legal developments in the field of the three main organizations charged
with securing human rights in Europe: EU, Council of Europe and OSCE. A chapter on cross-cutting topics helps understand the institutional dynamics of human rights protection in Europe. This edition also showcases the results of FRAME, a key human rights research project funded by the EU.
The impressive array of authors – academics and diplomats, practitioners and human rights experts – makes the book essential reading for anyone interested in human rights in Europe and beyond.

Download here the flyer

Rule of Law and Transitional Justice. Towards a triangular learning. The case of Colombia

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Editor: Anja Mihr, SIM, Utrecht University

Publisher: European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC) and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)

First edition: September 2013
DOI: 10.7404/EIUC.2012.01

This publication is the result of the three days experimental conference endeavor on the Rule of Law and Transitional Justice and the Triangular Learning between three very different actors and cases: Colombia, Tunisia and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) in November 2012 at the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC) in Venice-Lido. Bringing actors, practitioners and academics together to discuss and assess, past and present, legal and political Transitional Justice processes in Colombia and Tunisia was already a challenge. For decades, Colombia is a conflict torn society aiming to reconcile and to establish the rule of law and more stable democratic structures. Tunisia is a young country in transition that faces similar struggles but yet, a different past and enduring struggle. Learning from each other’s past and present experiences how and by what Transitional Justice means and measures to overcome grave injustice, install reparations, compensations or memorial and install at the same time a rule of law regime, is already a challenge for each country. Yet more so, if one tries to find common denominators and ways to learn from each other and bring different actors together. Bringing in a third mediating actor, a development corporation such as the GIZ on a “neutral” ground such as EIUC, is yet another experiment which made this conference a unique and successful experience for all.

Download here this publication.

European Yearbook on Human Rights

Since 2009 EIUC is actively involved in the edition of the European Yearbook on Human Rights published by Intersentiain cooperation with representatives of other three major European human rights research, teaching and training institutions.

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Holistic in its approach, but detailed in its analyses, the European Yearbook on Human Rights provides its readers with a comprehensive overview of the human rights situation in Europe. The impressive array of authors – academics and diplomats, practitioners and human rights experts – makes the series essential reading for anyone interested in human rights in Europe and beyond. The editors are Wolfgang Benedek, Florence Benoît-Rohmer, Wolfram Karl, Manfred Nowak.

European Yearbook on Human Rights 2013

ISBN: 978-3-7083-0925-5
447 p., paperback, June 2013
Editors: Wolfgang Benedek / Florence Benoît-Rohmer / Wolfram Karl / Matthias C. Kettemann / Manfred Nowak

In terms of human rights 2012 was the year of coherence: The EU adopted the first Strategic Framework and Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy and appointed its first Special Representative for Human Rights. At the Council of Europe, the importance of coherence in executing judgments and in improving the efficiency of justice remains high. And the story of OSCE’s human dimension proves to be one of ensuring policy coherence.

Defining and discussing key developments in human rights, the fifth edition of the European Yearbook on Human Rights brings together 26 contributions by renowned human rights experts that provide a much needed overview and sought-after analysis.

Edited jointly by representatives of four major European human rights research, teaching and training institutions, the Yearbook 2013 covers extensively all relevant developments in the field of the three main organizations charged with securing human rights in Europe: EU, Council of Europe and OSCE. A further chapter contains contributions on the role of civil society in human rights protection and on cross-cutting topics.

European Yearbook on Human Rights 2012

In the fourth volume of this series jointly edited by the representatives of four major European human rights research, teaching and training institutions, the authors analyse the developments in the field of the three main organisations charged with securing human rights in Europe: the EU, Council of Europe and OSCE.
Each organisation is analysed in a specific section made up of several contributions by academics, diplomats, professionals and human rights experts.
The Yearbook also dedicates chapters to the ‘Arab Spring’, the role of civil society in human rights protection and to other cross-cutting topics.

More information and order form available here

European Yearbook on Human Rights 2011

In the human rights field, 2010 was a year both of continuity and reform: from the 10th anniversary of the European Charter on Fundamental Rights and the quickening pace of the EU’s accession to the European Convention on Human Rights to the reform of the Human Rights Council. Defining and discussing key developments in human rights in Europe and in the world, the third edition of the European Yearbook on Human Rights brings together 33 contributions by renowned human rights experts that provide a much needed overview and much sought after analysis.

European Yearbook on Human Rights 2010

Opening with four articles on 2009’s most important human rights topics, the Yearbook contains extensive sections on developments in the field of the three main organisations charged with securing human rights in Europe: EU, Council of Europe and OSCE. A further chapter looks at the role of civil society in human rights protection and at multidisciplinary topics.
Holistic in its approach, rich in information and highly useful in its analyses, the European Yearbook on Human Rights 2010 provides its readers with a comprehensive overview of the human rights situation in Europe in 2009.
The impressive array of authors – academics and diplomats, practitioners and human rights experts – makes the book essential reading for anyone interested in human rights in Europe and beyond.

European Yearbook on Human Rights 2009

The protection of human rights lies at the very core of European integration. But considering the multitude of activities by the EU, the Council of Europe, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), it is often difficult to keep track. In-depth analysis by human rights experts is important for understanding changing paradigms and assessing emerging trends. For this purpose, this first volume of the new European Yearbook on Human Rights, which is edited jointly by representatives of four major European human rights institutions, brings together 20 contributions by renowned European human rights experts. The Yearbook’s innovative structure allows for quick orientation and direct access to the many facets of Europe’s culture of human rights. Opening with three articles on the topical issues of the year, the Yearbook contains extensive sections on the developments of the three most important European organizations charged with securing human rights: the EU, the Council of Europe, and the OSCE. A further chapter looks at the role of civil society and cross-cutting issues in human rights protection. Multi-disciplinary and eminently readable, European Yearbook on Human Rights 09 provides its readers with a comprehensive overview of the human rights situation in Europe in 2008.

Editors: Wolfgang Benedek, Wolfram Karl, Anja Mihr, Manfred Nowak.

60 Years of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Europe

Publisher: Intersentia (April 3, 2009)

Editors: dr. Vinodh Jaichand of the Irish Centre for Human Rights at Galway and Professor Markku Suksi of the Department of Law at Åbo Akademi University.

The publication 60 Years of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Europe — born out of co-operation between 41 universities in the 27 EU countries — is a commentary and a narrative concerning the reception and understanding of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) in the legal and political order of each country on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the UDHR. In addition, three European regional organizations — the Council of Europe, the European Union, and the Organization of Security and Co-Operation in Europe — contributed to this unique book. The human rights experiences vary, depending on the ‘European grouping.’ These include: the experience of the original West European countries that created the Council of Europe and later became the European Union • the experience of countries which have been under dictatorship and managed to rid themselves of the yoke of authoritarian rule • the experience of the Central and East European countries that remained so long behind the so-called Iron Curtain • the experience of a number of countries which were placed in a particular historical context in 1948. Each of these counties tells a different story about human rights and democratization, but taken together, this is the ‘European Story of Human Rights and Democratization.’ This book is unique also from the point of view that it actually compiles a pool of normatively relevant empirical information which is of interest both from the perspective of international law and comparative law. Consequently, the book raises intriguing issues about the binding nature of the UDHR in the domestic legal orders of different countries. Through legal, political, and historical perspectives, all countries and international organizations involved were able to find a suitable methodological approach to the issues raised. The comparisons that can be made on the basis of the different contributions make it possible to state that, from the perspective of today, the European story of human rights is one of diversity within unity.

More information and order form available here

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