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The Local Relevance of Human Rights

Edited by Koen De Feyter, Stephan Parmentier, Christiane Timmerman, George Ulrich

Contributors: Koen De Feyter, Stephan Parmentier, Felipe Gómez Isa, Antonio Papisca, Gaby Oré Aguilar, Michelle Farrell, Alicia Ely Yamin, J. Jaime Miranda, Julie Cavanaugh-Bill, José Aylwin, Rhuks Temitope Ako, María del Mar Bermúdez, Manuel Calzada Plá, Lydia Vicente Márquez, George Ulrich

Series: European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation. Cambridge University Press, 2010. 408 pages.
ISBN-13: 9781107009561 Hardback

Excerpt of the presentation of the book in CUP website

Do human rights offer real protection when disadvantaged groups invoke them at the local level in an attempt to improve their living conditions? If so, how can we make sure that the experiences of those invoking human rights at the local level have an impact on the further development of human rights (at national and other levels) so that the local relevance of human rights increases? Since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) on 10 December 1948, numerous international documents have reaffirmed human rights as global norms. This book examines what factors determine whether appeals to human rights that emanate from the local level are successful, and whether the UDHR adequately responds to threats as currently defined by relevant groups or whether a revision of some of the ideas included in the UDHR is needed in order to increase its contemporary relevance.
United Nations Reform and the New Collective Security

Edited by Peter G. Danchin, Horst Fischer.

Contributors: Koen De Feyter, Stephan Parmentier, Felipe Gómez Isa, Antonio Papisca, Gaby Oré Aguilar, Michelle Farrell, Alicia Ely Yamin, J. Jaime Miranda, Julie Cavanaugh-Bill, José Aylwin, Rhuks Temitope Ako, María del Mar Bermúdez, Manuel Calzada Plá, Lydia Vicente Márquez, George Ulrich

Series:European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation.
Cambridge University Press, 2010. 450 pages.
ISBN 978-0-521-51543-6 Hardback

Excerpt of the presentation of the book in CUP website

In 2004, the Report of the Secretary-General’s High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change emphasised the linkages between economic development, security and human rights, and the imperative in the twenty-first century of collective action and cooperation between States. In a world deeply divided by differences of power, wealth, culture and ideology, central questions today in international law and organisation are whether reaffirmation of the concept of collective security and a workable consensus on the means of its realisation are possible. In addressing these questions, this book considers the three key documents in the recent UN reform process: the High-Level Panel report, the Secretary-General’s In Larger Freedom report and the 2005 World Summit Outcome document. The chapters examine the responsibilities, commitments, strategies and institutions necessary for collective security to function both in practice and as a normative ideal in international law and relations between state and non-state actors alike.

Economic Globalisation and Human Rights

The first volume in this series Economic Globalisation and Human Rights, edited by Professors Wolfgang Benedek, Koen De Feyter and Fabrizio Marrella, was presented in the European Parliament on Wednesday 28 March 2007.

Description of the book in this website.

Economic globalisation is one of the guiding paradigms of the twenty-first century. The challenge it implies for human rights is fundamental, and key questions have up to now received no satisfying answers. How can human rights protect human dignity when economic globalisation has an adverse impact on local living conditions? How should human rights evolve in response to a global economy in which non-statal actors are decisive forces? Economic Globalisation and Human Rights was originally published in 2007, and sets out to assess these and other questions to ensure that, as economic globalisation intensifies, human rights take up the central and crucial position that they deserve. Using a multidisciplinary methodology, leading scholars reflect on issues such as the need for global ethics, the localisation of human rights, the role of human rights in WTO law, and efforts to make international economic organisations more accountable and multinational corporations more socially responsible.

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